Book Review 25 – Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

I had been meaning to read this book since it first came out and I eventually came to it with two very different recommendations. My colleague leant me this pristine hardcopy that she had treated herself to, whilst imparting the opinion that the book was alright once you got through the first bit. Not really a resounding endorsement, but at the same time I had another friends recommendation, who told me that it was her favourite book of 2017.  Quite an accolade! So I was intrigued as to what I would make of it.

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine centres around the isolated life of the socially inept Eleanor herself. She dresses weird, she acts weird, she is weird. Or so her colleagues think. The reader, inside Eleanor’s head see’s her torturously heading towards social faux pas because she has misunderstood the situation and you begin to feel a sense of empathy with Eleanor. More than that, she begins to endear herself to you with her complete lack of self awareness. Eleanor has a quirky little wit that she shares with the reader. The daftness of it combined with her vulnerability made me love her all the more!

It is when, despite herself, she ends up getting into an unlikely friendship with Raymond from IT that Eleanor’s life begins to change. Through the revelations she makes about her past we come to understand the abuse and neglect that have led her to where she is today.

This is a career defining debut. One wonders what Gail Honeyman could possibly produce next to compete with this book. There is a real appreciation of the human psyche here. She has managed in this book to sum up loneliness, but has also given Eleanor a chink of hope.

When we reach the end and discover the twist that I certainly did not see coming being, as I was, too focused on another element of the storyline, you really get to see how long Eleanor has been self flagellating for a wrong that she didn’t commit. It is the sadness of her past that has kept her trapped in loneliness all these years, but her beautifully unfolding friendship with Raymond allows Eleanor to let herself live again rather than merely existing as a shadow in this world.

Honeyman has produced a touching novel which encourages genuine empathy for those around us. How often do we judge people based on the way they come across? And how much better would it be for us to suspend judgement because, really, what do we know about the life they have lived or why they are this way? To me Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine was a book about how important it is to show kindness to our fellow human beings. So go forth, read the book and be thoroughly lovely to all ye shall meet!

Next week is a very special one. It marks the mid way point of this challenge! I will be reviewing Shards of Sunlight by Anand Nair. Come back and see what I have to say for myself on Monday.

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