Book Review 17 – The Burgas Affair by Ellis Shuman

Merry Christmas my web hopping, crimble celebrating readers! I hope you and yours are having a wonderful day and that Santa left you something super special under the christmas tree. Thank you for stopping by in-between the Queens speech and EastEnders, it is most appreciated. If you are joining me later in the week, I hope you had a good one and have been sleeping off the egg-nog!

This week’s post is a super special one. Firstly because it is published on Christmas Day and secondly because I was approached directly by Ellis Shuman to write it. He is the first author to provide me a free copy of his book in return for an honest and unbiased review (this is what all the other book bloggers write so I thought I had better put this important bit of information in also!) So thanks to Ellis Shuman for an important Christmassy first! 😊

So to the book then. The Burgas Affair is a fictional account of the police investigation that took place after the real life bombing of an Israeli tourist bus in the Belgian city of Burgas. The story centres around two police officers. Boyko is a prickly officer who has been brought in from another unit to work with old colleagues and finds himself partnered with the Israeli Ayala. For her part, Ayala is aloof and mistrustful of Boyko and the other Bulgarians.

The Burgas Affair houses a well structured story. The dialogue was at times a little stilted. I also felt that a lot was spelled out for the reader and the narrator’s voice comes through a lot to describe the backstory, it would have been nice to come to some of this information in a more natural way such as through naturally flowing dialogue. However the stars of the show were  undoubtedly Boyko and Alaya themselves. Shuman had clearly given a lot of thought  to both these characters histories and the baggage that they would bring to this particular case. Boyko and Alaya effected and in turn were affected by the case and were both intriguing characters from the start. Shuman also possesses a talent for description. One of the nice things about this novel was that you saw Bulgaria through his eyes. Kind of like a city break, but much cheaper!

Towards the end of the book I was turning pages at a feverish page to see how our guy was going to get out of his predicament. Whether he does or doesn’t escape I’ll leave for you to discover yourself, but the story races on to the finale without a conclusive ending, which either paves the way for a sequel or is intended to portray the real-life outcomes of many crimes. I think I have mentioned before, I do actually like endings that don’t sew everything up into neat little pockets. Life isn’t like that and I like the books I read to reflect that too.

Having not read much crime before and whilst I thought the narrative could have been improved, the plot and central characters of The Burgas Affair kept me reading. I’m very glad to have had Shuman introduce me to crime fiction and I’ll definitely be returning to the genre to see what else is out there.

Which brings me nicely onto next week’s book. I’ll be reading something old that has had something of a new lease of life recently. Come and take a look at my review of ‘Murder on the Orient Express’ by the legendary Agatha Christie next Monday. What better way to start the year than with a murder mystery?!


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